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Feeling a Future Coming (2024)

Video Documentation at the University of Arizona Museum of Art | April 13 - May 11, 2024

Scroll down to view the full exhibition gallery, artist statement and list of works.

List of Exhibited Works

(Descriptions correspond with the image gallery above)

Image 1
Installation Documentation of "Feeling a Future Coming", in University of Arizona Museum of Art, 2024.

Images 2-3
Trophy No. 26, 12”x10”, 2024, Female Ejaculate, Semen, Squirting, Menstrual Blood, Vaginal Transudate, UV Print on Acrylic.

Image 4
Installation Documentation.

Images 5-6
Trophy No. 23, 12”x10”, 2024, Female Ejaculate, Semen, Squirting, Vaginal Transudate, UV Print on Acrylic.

Images 7-10
Missile No. 26, 72”h x 48”w, 2024, UV Print on Acrylic.

Images 11-12
Stardust No. 5, 72”h x 48”w, 2024, UV Print on Acrylic.

Image 13
Installation Documentation.

Image 14
"Gold and Glitter" (Preview Version), Single Channel 4k Video and Audio, 6:40min, 2024

Images 15-18
(Left to Right in Triptych): Missile No. 19, 25”h x 17”w, 2024, UV Print on Acrylic | Tower No. 6, 25”h x 17”w, 2024, UV Print on Acrylic | Missile No. 12, 25”h x 19 11/16”w, 2024, UV Print on Acrylic.

Image 19
Installation Documentation.

Images 20-21
Drone No. 6, 72”w x 48”h, 2024, UV Print on Acrylic.

Images 22-23
Trophy No. 27, 12”x10”, 2024, Semen, Menstrual Blood, UV Print on Acrylic.

Image 24
Installation Documentation.

Images 25-26
Trophy No. 25, 12”x10”, 2024, Semen, UV Print on Acrylic.

Image 27
Installation Documentation.

Images 28-30
Missile No. 26, 72”h x 48”w, 2024, UV Print on Acrylic.

© Nathan Cordova

"Gold and Glitter" 4k Video and Audio, 6:40min, 2024.

(Preview Version) Please contact the artist to request the full version.

Part of "Feeling a Future Coming"

About

"Feeling a Future Coming" (2024)

Feeling a Future Coming considers the potential of friendship and offers a pointed critique of institutions and our consumption of their products. Friendship is slippery and difficult to maintain. There are social and cultural taboos that attempt to constrain our friendships. This is a social experiment that breaks through the isolation we all feel. What does it say about our present moment where amidst profound loneliness, we desire visceral connections with each other in order to transcend the limits of our individual bodies? By inviting participation, I’m asking myself and my friends to step out of this isolation and to encounter each other anew. I’m valuing critical connections over critical mass, applying force on strategic pressure points that form the boundaries of typical friendships. There is a momentary embodiment of liberation in this act, as I re-imagine what is possible.

I appropriate and recontextualize collections of digital images of western domination gathered from the internet. This involves engaging with both the visible architecture like the skyscraper, and the supposedly invisible infrastructure, such as data centers and military drones. Anger and pleasure play an important role, offering a means of embodiment and exploration of the collection’s emotional and sensorial dimensions. Through a material intervention, I challenge notions of fixed identity and embrace the fluidity and multiplicity of human experience. This interruption utilizes an interdisciplinary process of layered blurring that transforms their symbolisms into something elemental; liquid and flame, semen and squirting, embodied presence etching sunlight and sifting blood.

Blurring the boundaries between past and present, self, and other, I invite viewers to engage these collections on a visceral level through the presence of their own reflections in black acrylic surfaces mediated by images layered with physical ejaculate, traces of our sequential self-pleasure. Remixed marketing videos from The University of Arizona and Raytheon (now rebranded as RTX Corporation) point to their mutually beneficial relationship built on endless cycles of debt and death.

All of this works together to disrupt conventional modes of perception. Challenging the rigidity of these images as repositories of meaning and enforcers of social order, Feeling a Future Coming reconfigures their signifiers to a point of emergence, where all futures become possible again. Reclaiming agency over our bodies and desires is a fundamental step toward liberation, contributing to a more empathetic and introspective society that questions rigid authority and embraces the beauty of uncertainty.

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